Collaborative PhD Studentship

New AHRC funded Tate / UEA Collaborative PhD Studentship

British Sporting and Animal Art, 1760-1840: A Critical History of its Production, Reception, Collection and Display. The University of East Anglia, in partnership with Tate, is seeking to appoint a suitably qualified applicant for a full-time collaborative PhD studentship critically re-evaluating the history of sporting and animal art in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain, for three years commencing 1 October 2014.

Principal Supervisor: Dr Sarah Monks (UEA). Second supervisor: Dr Martin Myrone (Tate).

The University of East Anglia, in partnership with Tate, is seeking to appoint a suitably qualified applicant for a full-time collaborative PhD studentship critically re-evaluating the history of sporting and animal art in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Britain, for three years commencing 1 October 2014.

This is an opportunity to pursue an original doctoral research project within one of the highest-ranking history of art departments in the UK (with a substantial community of scholars working on British art) whilst working closely with a museum collection of international importance.

The proposed research will consider sporting and animal art in Britain during the period 1760-1840 through a critically-engaged contextual analysis of key works from the Tate collection, informed by archival research into the genre's production and contemporary reception within the British art world, as well as its subsequent display and interpretation within the context of the national collection of British art. The successful applicant will be based in the School of Art History and World Art Studies, UEA, and at Tate Britain, and expected to contribute to the research culture of both institutions.

 

John Frederick Herring (1795‑1865)
Birmingham with Patrick Conolly Up,
and his Owner, John Beardsworth.
1830
Oil paint on canvas
Tate

Presented by Paul Mellon
through the British Sporting Art Trust 1979

 

 

Despite its importance within the history of British art (and the Tate collection, which has over 100 representative works, including important bequests from Paul Mellon and Mrs Ambrose Clark), sporting and animal art of this period has received remarkably little scholarly attention as an art form. With very few exceptions, this genre has been a highly specialised area of enquiry which has sat at the margins of British art history. Ellis Waterhouse, a defining figure of modern British art historical practice, asserted that ‘the general run of sporting painting, although of absorbing interest to the social historian and to the student of the turf is … no business of the historian of art'. As a consequence of such attitudes, works by artists such as Abraham Cooper, John Frederick Herring, Thomas Woodward, even James Ward – all popular figures in their day, all represented in the Tate collection – have received little or no sustained study.

The proposed PhD project is intended to remedy this situation by studying and analysing the practice and reception of sporting and animal art in Britain during this period, offering a fresh interpretation of this genre in light of current methodological trends within the historiography of British art. The project will consider these works as works of art through contextualising analyses informed by archival research into their production and reception within the contemporary art world (including exhibition spaces, art collections, art criticism and print publishing), as well as recent critical studies of sporting and animal art from other cultural traditions. The project will therefore combine visual and historical analysis, pursued through close inspection of artworks and other archival resources, and critical reading of primary and secondary texts.  Given the project's contextualising and intellectual aims, those texts will be drawn from a variety of disciplines including social, cultural and political history, and aesthetics.

The studentship is funded through the AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award programme, and includes tuition fees up to the standard Home/EU amount  and an annual stipend of £13,863 plus an additional CDA maintenance payment of £550.

Funding for PhD studentships from AHRC is available to successful candidates who meet the UK Research Council eligibility criteria. These requirements are detailed in the AHRC studentships handbook (http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/SiteCollectionDocuments/Student-Funding-Guide.pdf). In most cases UK and EU nationals who have been ordinarily resident in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the course are eligible for a full-award. Other EU nationals may qualify for a fees only award or a full award if they are migrant workers in the UK. All candidates should check the AHRC eligibility guidelines to confirm their eligibility for funding.

Applicants should hold (or expect to achieve) a Master's degree and either a 1st Class or Upper 2nd Class Honours degree in a relevant discipline.

Application deadline is 23 June 2014.

More information and details of how to apply can be found at:

https://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

Alternatively please contact the UEA Postgraduate Research Office.

Email: pgr.enquiries.admiss@uea.ac.uk. Tel: (01603) 591709.

Informal enquiries are welcomed by Dr Sarah Monks. Email: s.monks@uea.ac.uk. Tel: (01603) 593768.


Our latest Facebook posts: